Things in Print Thursday :: an analysis of “Best-Coming-of-Age Books for Girls” part two

12 Nov

Continued from last week.  Oh, and the list is here.

  1. Mrs. Dalloway (Virginia Woolf): white lesbian/queer/bisexual/unsure female protagonist
  2. Nightwork (Christine Schutt): short stories.
  3. Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail (Cheryl Strayed): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  4. Vida (Patricia Engel): Colombian hetrosexual (?) female protagonist.
  5. Sabriel (Garth Nix): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  6. Kindred (Octavia Butler): African-American heterosexual female protagonist.
  7. Fun Home (Alison Bechdel): white lesbian female protagonist.
  8. We Have Always Lived in the Castle (Shirley Jackson): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  9. The House of Mirth (Edith Wharton): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  10. The Handmaid’s Tale (Margaret Atwood): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  11. Play It as It Lays (Joan DIdion): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  12. Dare Me (Megan Abbott): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  13. Why Did I Ever (Mary Robison): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  14. At the Bottom of the River (Jamaica Kincaid): Afro-Caribbean heterosexual female protagonist.
  15. Marilyn (Gloria Steinem): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  16. Transformations (Anne Sexton): short stories.
  17. The Complete Claudine (Colette): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  18. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents (Julia Alvarez): Dominican female heterosexual protagonist.
  19. The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson (Emily Dickinson): poems.
  20. The Enchanted Forest Chrnoicles (Patricia C. Wrede): white heterosexual female protagonist.
  21. Purple Hibiscus (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie): Nigerian heterosexual female protagonist.
  22. The Woman Warrior (Maxine Hong Kingston): Chinese-American heterosexual female protagonist.
  23. The Dream of a Common Language (Adrienne Rich): poems.
  24. No One Belongs Here More Than You (Miranda July): short stories.
  25. Ghost World (Daniel Clowes): white heterosexual female protagonists.

Once again.  Not exclusively but primarily straight and white.  Sigh.

–your fangirl heroine.

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